Practicing 'Tsē-khom' at |Giribes
Practicing 'Tsē-khom' at |Giribes

'Tse-khom' is a greeting and offering practice directed towards ancestors associated by Damara / ≠Nūkhoen people with key places and landscapes. Photo: Sian Sullivan, May 1995.

Haiseb ||Kho||khobab, Upper Barab
Haiseb ||Kho||khobab, Upper Barab

Large cairns attributed to a significant ancestor-hero-trickster named in west Namibia as Haiseb are found throughout western southern Africa, from the Cape to the Kunene River. This image is one of several similar cairns found throughout the current Palmwag Tourism Concession, in land areas known by local Damara and ||Ubun people by names such as Hurubes. Many stories remain in local folklore about the wonderful and clever acts attributed to Haiseb. (Photo: Sian Sullivan, 211114)

BBC journalist Robin Denselow
BBC journalist Robin Denselow

with one of the festival organisers and our two fixers, Santjie Tsowases and George Garad, in course of making World on 3 radio programme about the Damara King's Festival, broadcast on BBC Radio 3 programme (Photo Angela Impey 05/11/16).

Practicing 'Tsē-khom' at |Giribes
Practicing 'Tsē-khom' at |Giribes

'Tse-khom' is a greeting and offering practice directed towards ancestors associated by Damara / ≠Nūkhoen people with key places and landscapes. Photo: Sian Sullivan, May 1995.

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Future Pasts is a cross-disciplinary Arts and Humanities research project exploring understandings and practices of sustainability in west Namibia, where three of our UK-based academics have long-term field experience. We work with a number of Namibian organisations, including the National Museum, Gobabeb Research and Training, and Save the Rhino Trust, to develop and conduct research that is empirically-rich, locally relevant, theoretically interesting and creative. Future Pasts is funded primarily through the UK's Arts and Humanities Research Council's Care for the Future theme (ref. AH/K005871/2).